Category Archives: Uncategorized

PENGUMUMAN MIGRASI

Kepada semua pengguna Redd info,

Terima kasih banyak atas kunjungannya ke site ini. Untuk meningkatkan kemudahan dan akses data maka kami saat ini telah bermigrasi ke website http://www.reddindonesia.info.
Selamat membaca!

salam
Tim Redd Info

http://www.reddindonesia.info

Surging demand for vegetable oil drives rainforest destruction

Source: Mongabay.com, March 14, 2012

Surging demand for vegetable oil has emerged as an important driver of tropical deforestation over the past two decades and is threatening biodiversity, carbon stocks, and other ecosystem functions in some of the world’s most critical forest areas, warns a report published last week by the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS).

But the report, titled Recipes for Success: Solutions for Deforestation-Free Vegetable Oils, sees some reason for optimism, including emerging leadership from some producers, rising demand for “greener” products from buyers, new government policies to monitor deforestation and shift cropland expansion to non-forest area, and partnerships between civil society and key private sector players to improve the sustainability of vegetable oil production.

“It’s important for consumers to insist that companies ensure the products they sell are deforestation-free,” said report co-author Calen May-Tobin, a policy analyst with UCS’s Tropical Forests and Climate Initiative, in a statement. “If leading companies commit to using deforestation-free vegetable oil in their products, others will follow suit, curbing the rate of deforestation and climate change.”

Vegetable oil demand has grown by more than five percent annually over the past decade due to rising affluence and population. To meet increased demand, large swathes of land have been converted for rapeseed (canola), oil palm, sugar cane, maize (corn), and soy. Some of the area has included carbon-dense rainforest in Brazil, Malaysia, and Indonesia, a development that has alarmed environmentalists, scientists, and people who rely on forests for subsistence.

But concern over the impact of oilseed expansion has begun to spur reform. Targeted campaigns by environmental groups have led some buyers to demand that palm oil, soy, and other oilseeds be produced at a lower cost to the environment. For example, a high-profile investigation by Greenpeace in 2006 led the Brazilian soy industry to implement a moratorium on conversion of rainforests for soybeans. Subsequent Greenpeace reports targeting PT SMART, an Indonesia palm oil giant owned by Sinar Mas and Golden Agri Resources (GAR), caused Unilever and Nestle — major palm oil buyers — to enact strict sourcing policies. These eventually led PT SMART to adopt a progressive policy that limits new oil palm development to lands with less than 35 tons of carbon and requires informed consent on the part of communities that may be affected by new plantations. PT SMART was the first, and remains the only, Indonesian palm oil major to establish such a policy, which effectively mandates deforestation-free palm oil.

Expansion of the oil palm estate and natural forest loss in Indonesia and Malaysia, 1990-2008. Click image to enlarge

Palm oil is now found in up to half of packaged processed foods in some markets. By virtue of its high yield, palm oil is a cheaper substitute than other vegetable oils, but it has lately been targeted by environmentalists because its production has at times taken a heavy toll on wildlife-rich rainforests and carbon-dense peat swamps in Indonesia and Malaysia. The Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO), which sets standards for production, is the palm oil industry’s response to these concerns.
While the developments are encouraging for the sake of the environment, hurdles remain. Some companies continue to strongly resist any effort to limit expansion into forests and peatlands. For example in February, GAPKI, the Indonesian palm oil industry association, inaccurately asserted that the United States and the E.U. banned Indonesian palm oil due to greenhouse gas emissions associated with production. GAPKI seems to have made the claim in part to stir up resentment towards efforts to improve the environmental performance of palm oil. Last year some Indonesian palm oil companies successfully lobbied to weaken Indonesia’s moratorium on new forest concessions for plantations.

Still the UCS report provides examples of nascent efforts to encourage oilseed expansion in degraded, non-forest areas, including conversion of invasive alang alang grasslands for oil palm plantations in Indonesia and low productivity cattle pasture for soy in Brazil. Not mentioned in the report, but important, is Brazil’s push to expand oil palm plantations in long ago deforested areas. The government’s biodiesel plan offers economic incentives to producers who follow strict social and environmental standards. The initiative could put pressure on developers who continue to clear forest for new plantations.

Oil palm acreage as a percentage of total forest cover in 2009
Oil palm acreage as a percentage of total forest cover in 2009. Data from FAO and the governments of Indonesia and Malaysia. Photo by Rhett A. Butler 2005.

Recipes for Success ends on hopeful note, concluding that future demand for vegetable oil can be met without converting critical forest areas.

“Producing deforestation-free cooking oils and other products is absolutely doable. We’ve seen it work in Brazil and we are encouraged by Nestle’s policies,” said May-Tobin in a statement. “But it’s up to businesses and governments to make the commitment and consumers to hold them to it.”

CITATION: Calen May-Tobin et al. Recipes for Success: Solutions for Deforestation-Free Vegetable Oils. Union of Concerned Scientists and Climate Advisers 2012.

http://news.mongabay.com/2012/0313-ucs_vegetable_oil_deforestation.html

Global emission cuts yield ‘nothing without US participation’

Source: The Jakarta Post
November 15, 2011
by Tifa Asrianti
Jakarta

As Indonesia has pledged to cut emissions, it is committed to convincing developed countries to follow suit during the next UN climate change conference later this month.

Rachmat Witoelar, head of the National Council on Climate Change (DNPI) and chief negotiator for Indonesia, said that his team would appeal to developed countries to fulfill their commitment and encourage developing
countries to cut emissions as much as possible.

“Indonesia started the initiative by declaring a 26 percent emission cut by 2020. As a result, there have been many countries following in our footsteps, such as Japan, Brazil and India,” Rachmat said.

The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) conference adopted the Kyoto Protocol in 1997, which set binding targets for 37 industrialized countries and the European community for
reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. These amount to an average of 5 percent decreases against 1990 levels over the five-year period between 2008-2012.

Industrialized countries, which are also among the world’s largest emitters, have been reluctant to adopt the protocol, stalling negotiations until the most recent conference in Cancun, Mexico, last year.

The Conference of Parties (COP) is scheduled to meet in Durban, South Africa, at the end of this month, carrying the burden of stalled negotiations on emission deals for 14 years.

Amid the growing resistance of developed countries to adhere to the Kyoto treaty, observers have doubted that the Durban talks would move the debate any closer to a deal.

Rachmat said that his team would try to persuade developed countries to report emission cuts, ranging from 25 percent to 40 percent, especially the US.

“If the world cuts carbon emissions but the US does not, there is no helping climate change,” he said.

Rachmat said that if the developed countries reduced emission, they would likely to experience a decrease in economic growth. He added, however, that economic declines would not place the countries in a similar
position as Bangladesh, or other poor countries.

“There is no such thing as a free lunch. You have to sacrifice a bit for the world. There are actually around 10 states in the US that have experienced economic growth through emission cuts. Declining economic growth
caused by emission cuts is a myth,” he said.

If negotiations crumble, Rachmat said Indonesia was still committed to emission cuts.

He said Indonesia would still carry out its strategy on a national action plan on reducing greenhouse emissions (RAN-GRK), as stipulated by a presidential regulation.

“If everyone does not want to commit to cutting emissions, Indonesia will stick to UNFCCC programs that benefit the people, such as fast track funding, adaptation programs and REDD+,” he said.

Rachmat said there would still be a chance to salvage Kyoto Protocol next year in COP18 conference in Seoul, South Korea.

He said that the countries could also meet in meetings leading to COP18 to decide on the protocol.

He said that Indonesia would also try to consolidate party groupings, such as Cartagena Group, an informal space open to all countries committed to reaching an ambitious outcome through the UNFCCC negotiations in
which Indonesia is a member, and Umbrella Group, a loose coalition of non-EU developed countries that was formed following the adoption of the Kyoto Protocol to work on the globally binding agreement.

“We have proposed holding a meeting with Cartagena Group countries here in Indonesia during the third quarter of next year. We will talk about strategies that are outside the least developed countries [LDC] and
extremely strong countries such as the US. We hope that the meeting will result in an action plan,” he said.

He said that there was a new paradigm proposed by Mexico for the decision-making articles as practiced in the Cancun conference last year. During the Cancun conference, there were several countries, including Sudan
and Bolivia, which refused to agree on the conference accord. Mexico ignored their objections and pursued passage of the accord.

“I personally agreed [with Mexico]. If 180 countries have agreed, but only one or two countries refused, the world can not wait for those countries to agree,” he said.
http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2011/11/15/global-emission-cuts-yield-nothing-without-us-participation.html

Program Pemerintah Daerah Ditunggu

Sumber : Kompas – 28 September 2011

Pasca-Penetapan Peraturan Presiden Nomor 61 Tahun 2011 tentang Rencana Aksi Nasional Penurunan Emisi Gas Rumah Kaca, pemerintah menunggu program kerja pemerintah daerah untuk mereduksi emisi gas rumah kaca.

Peraturan presiden (perpres) menugaskan, Kementerian Perencanaan dan Pembangunan Nasional mengoordinasi pelaksanaan program-program pemerintah daerah. Selanjutnya, dibahas dan dibiayai melalui APBN 2013.

Wakil Menteri Perencanaan dan Pembangunan Nasional (Bappenas) Lukita Dinarsyah Tuwo, Selasa (27/9), di Jakarta, mengatakan, program dalam rencana kerja pemerintah daerah harus memuat unsur-unsur pengurangan emisi karbon. ”Penyusunan RAN-GRK sudah sejak tahun lalu. Karena itu sudah termasuk dalam program kerja 2012,” ujarnya. Kini, Bappenas sedang mengerjakan pedoman penyusunan program kerja.

Nantinya, pemerintah daerah harus kreatif merencanakan penurunan emisi sesuai karakteristik wilayahnya. ”Ini bagian dari tahapan pengurangan emisi 26 persen pada tahun 2020, seperti dinyatakan Presiden,” kata Lukita yang juga anggota Satuan Tugas Pembentukan Kelembagaan REDD+.

Kebakaran hutan

Pengurangan emisi dari sektor kehutanan, salah satunya menekan kebakaran lahan dan deforestasi serta mencegah kerusakan lahan gambut. Itu tidak mudah, karena selain harus menjaga hutan dan lingkungan tetap lestari, pemerintah harus mencapai pertumbuhan ekonomi 7 persen pada tahun 2010, atau 8-9 persen pada tahun 2020.

Sebelumnya, ditanya mengenai perpres ini, Gubernur DKI Jakarta Fauzi Bowo mengatakan, Jakarta siap melaksanakan. ”Kontribusi terbesar emisi di Jakarta dari sektor lalu lintas. Salah satu program kami, seperti uji emisi dan electronic road pricing (ERP),” ucapnya.

Emisi dari sektor energi juga dikurangi dengan penerapan standar bangunan ramah lingkungan. DKI Jakarta akan menerbitkan peraturan daerah tentang inspektur atau pengawas bangunan ramah lingkungan. (ICH)

Link : http://nasional.kompas.com/read/2011/09/28/03480368/program.pemerintah.daerah.ditunggu

Governors’ Climate Forum Annual Meeting 2011 to be held in central Kalimantan

August 25, 2011

Some 30 governors from various countries will gather at the Luwansa Hotel at Palangkaraya, the capital of the central Kalimantan province in Indonesia, from September 20 to 22 to attend The Governors’ Climate Forum (GCF) Annual Meeting 2011.

The Annual Meeting is a unique opportunity for information exchange and progress on the GCF’s Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD)-related objectives. The former California governor – and one of the initiators of GCF – Arnold Schwarzenegger, is scheduled to attend the event.

The meeting will include: a high-level session attended by ministers, governors, environment secretaries, and other governmental and inter-governmental organization representatives; key updates from member states and provinces on major GCF developments including the GCF REDD+ Knowledge Database and the GCF Fund; and facilitated breakout sessions on high priority topics including alignment of national and sub-national REDD policies and environmental and social safeguards, which will result in concrete action items for the GCF moving forward.

The Governors’ Climate and Forests Task Force (GCF) is a unique sub-national collaboration between 15 states and provinces from the United States, Brazil, Indonesia, Nigeria, and Mexico that seeks to integrate Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD) and other forest carbon activities into emerging greenhouse gas (GHG) compliance regimes in the United States and elsewhere. As such, the GCF represents an important component of broader efforts to mobilize and advance financing for REDD activities on a pay-for-performance basis; to provide recommendations for legal and regulatory design of GHG compliance markets to recognize REDD activities; to build capacity for such activities in large subnational jurisdictions in key tropical forest countries; and to develop institutions and programs for linking subnational REDD activities with ongoing national and international efforts.

The Governors’ Climate and Forests (GCF) Task Force originated in November 2008 with a meeting called the Governors’ Global Climate Summit in Los Angeles. At the meeting, the governors of the states of California, Illinois, and Wisconsin signed a Memorandum of Understanding to work with the governors of six states in Indonesia and Brazil on reducing deforestation. A press release about the MoU from the office of Arnold Schwarzenegger, Governor of California at the time, stated that “This agreement is the first state-to-state, sub-national agreement focused on reducing emissions from deforestation and land degradation (REDD) programs.”

The island of Kalimantan itself counts eight large national parks, two among which are renowned orang utan reserves located in the province of Central Kalimantan. These are the Tanjung Puting National Park near Pangkalan Bun, and the Sebangau National Park, habitat to the largest community of orangutans in the wild.

How to get to Palangkaraya: please click Palangkaraya: Get There.

For more information on the Governors’ Climate Forum, visit the GCF official website: http://www.gcftaskforce.org/.

Link: http://www.eturbonews.com/24825/governors-climate-forum-annual-meeting-2011-be-held-central-kali

Special report: How Indonesia crippled its own climate change

Ministry officials skeptical about UN forest program

August 20, 2011
By David Fogarty, Reuters

SINGAPORE – In July 2010, U.S. investor Todd Lemons and Russian energy giant Gazprom believed they were just weeks from winning final approval for a landmark forest preservation project in Indonesia.

A year later, the project is close to collapse, a casualty of labyrinthine Indonesian bureaucracy, opaque laws and a secretive palm oil company.

The Rimba Raya project, on the island of Borneo, is part of a United Nations-backed scheme designed to reward poorer nations that protect their carbon-rich jungles.

Deep peat in some of Indonesia’s rainforests stores billions of tonnes of carbon, so preserving those forests is regarded as crucial in the fight against climate change.

By putting a value on the carbon, the 90,000-hectare project would help prove that investors can turn a profit from the world’s jungles in ways that do not involve cutting them down.

After three years of work, more than $2 million in development costs, and what seemed like the green light from Jakarta, the project is proof that saving the world’s tropical rainforests will be far more complicated than simply setting up a framework to allow market forces to function.

A Reuters investigation into the case also shows the forestry ministry is highly skeptical about a market for forest carbon credits, placing it at odds with President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono, who supports pay-and-preserve investments to fight climate change.

Hong Kong-based Lemons, 47, a veteran of environmentally sustainable, and profitable, projects, discovered just how frustrating the ministry can be to projects such as his.

“Success was literally two months around the corner,” he said. “We went through – if there are 12 steps, we went through the first 11 on time over a two-year period. We had some glitches, but by and large we went through the rather lengthy and complicated process in the time expected.”

That’s when the forestry ministry decided to slash the project’s area in half, making it unviable, and handing a large chunk of forested deep peatland to a palm oil company for development.

The case is a stark reminder to Norway’s government, the world’s top donor to projects to protect tropical forests, on just how tough it will be to preserve Indonesia’s rainforests under its $1-billion climate deal with Jakarta.

UNLIMITED CORRUPTION

The dispute has turned a spotlight on Indonesia’s forestry ministry, which earns $15 billion a year in land permit fees from investors. Indonesia’s Corruption Eradication Commission (KPK) said last month it will investigate the granting of forest permits and plans to crack down on corruption in the resources sector.

“It’s a source of unlimited corruption,” said Chandra M. Hamzah, deputy chairman at the KPK.

Indonesia Corruption Watch, a private watchdog, says illegal logging and violations in issuing forest use permits are rampant. It estimates ill-gotten gains total about 20 trillion rupiah ($2.3 billion) each year.

A forest ministry official connected with the UN-backed forest carbon offset scheme was sentenced in April to three years in prison for accepting a $10,000 bribe to ensure an Indonesian company won a procurement tender.

Wandojo Siswanto was one of the negotiators for Indonesia’s delegation at the 2009 UN climate talks in Copenhagen, despite being a bribery suspect. His case has highlighted concerns about the capacity of the forestry ministry to manage forest-carbon projects.

The forestry sector has a long history of mismanagement and graft. Former trade and industry minister Bob Hasan, a timber czar during the Suharto years, was fined 50 billion rupiah ($7 million) for ordering the burning of forests in Sumatra and then imprisoned in a separate case of forestry fraud after Suharto was toppled from power in 1998.

In an interview in Jakarta, senior forestry ministry officials denied any wrongdoing in the Rimba Raya case and criticized the project’s backers for a deal they made with Russia’s Gazprom, the world’s largest gas producer, to market the project’s carbon credits.

Internal forestry ministry documents that Reuters obtained show how the ministry reversed its support for the project after a new minister came in, and a large chunk of the project’s land was turned over to a palm oil firm.

The case illustrates how growing demand for land, bureaucratic hurdles and powerful vested interests are major obstacles to conservation projects in Indonesia and elsewhere in the developing world.

That makes it hard for these projects to compete and navigate through multiple layers of government with the potential for interference and delay.

“We have systematically not been able to demonstrate that we can complete the loop to turn projects into dollar investments,” said Andrew Wardell, program director, forests and governance, at the Centre for International Forestry Research in Indonesia.

“Which is why the palm oil industry is winning hands down every time.”

SHOWCASE PROJECT

The Rimba Raya project was meant to save a large area of carbon-rich peat swamp forest in Central Kalimantan province and showcase Jakarta’s efforts to fight climate change.

Much of the area is dense forest that lies atop oozy black peat flooded by tea-coloured water. Dozens of threatened or endangered species such as orangutans, proboscis monkeys, otter civets and Borneo bay cats live in the area, which is adjacent to a national park.

Rimba Raya was designed to be part of the UN’s Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD) program. The idea is simple: Every tonne of carbon locked away in the peat and soaked up by the trees would earn a steady flow of carbon credits.

Profit from the sale of those credits would go to project investors and partners, local communities and the Indonesian government. That would allow the project to pay its way and compete with palm oil farmers and loggers who might otherwise destroy it.

Rich countries and big companies can buy the credits to offset their emissions.

By preserving a large area of peat swamp forest, Rimba Raya was projected to cut carbon emissions by nearly 100 million tonnes over its 30-year life, which would translate into total saleable credits of about $500 million, Gazprom says.

It would also be a sanctuary for orphaned or rehabilitated orangutans from elsewhere in Borneo. Rimba Raya teamed up with the founder of Orangutan Foundation International, Birute Mary Galdikas, in which OFI would receive a steady income from annual carbon credit sales.

It was the sort of project President Yudhoyono and Norway have pledged to support. Yudhoyono has put forests – Indonesia is home to the world’s third-largest forest lands – at the centre of a pledge to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by at least 26 per cent by 2020.

He tasked a senior adviser to press for reforms to make REDD projects easier and for greater transparency at the forestry ministry.

GOLD STANDARD

Rimba Raya was poised for success. It got backing from the Clinton Foundation’s Climate Initiative, which helped pay for some of the early costs. Gazprom invested more than $1 million.

It was the first in the world to meet stringent REDD project rules under the Washington-based Voluntary Carbon Standard, an industry-respected body that issues carbon credits. Rimba Raya was also the first to earn a triple-gold rating under the Climate, Community and Biodiversity Alliance, a separate verifier.

Companies including German insurer Allianz and Japanese telecoms giant NTT pledged to buy credits from the project if it gets its licence.

In December 2009, the forestry ministry tentatively named the now-Indonesian-registered company PT Rimba Raya Conservation the licence holder for nearly 90,000 ha, contingent on it passing an environmental impact assessment. It did so a few months later.

The ownership of PT Rimba Raya Conservation is split 70 per cent foreign and 30 per cent Indonesian, with Lemons and business partner Jim Procanik holding small stakes.

Lemons is CEO of Hong Kong-based firm InfiniteEARTH, which is the developer and manager of the Rimba Raya project as well as investment fundraiser. Procanik, 44, is the managing director.

In June last year, Forestry Minister Zulkifli Hasan asked for a map that would set the final boundary of the project, according to a copy of the instruction seen by Reuters. This mandatory step normally takes a few weeks. Once the map is issued, a project is eligible for a licence to operate.

But by September last year it was clear something was wrong, according to Lemons. Despite repeated promises by ministry officials, the final map had not been issued. No explanations were given.

“No one has ever said, ‘No.’ So that’s exhausting,” Lemons said.

What followed instead was a series of steps by the forestry ministry that have resulted in the project being undermined.

A ministry review focused on conflicting claims to the land by several companies belonging to palm oil firm, PT Best Group.

PT Best, which is run by Indonesian brothers Winarto and Winarno Tjajadi, had long coveted the peat land within the area the forestry ministry set aside for the Rimba Raya project.

On Dec. 31, 2010, PT Best was granted 6,500 ha of peat swamp land for palm oil development, next to a smaller parcel of deep peat land granted a year earlier – part of PT Best’s broader plan to connect its palm oil plantations in the north with a port on the coast nearby. The land granted last December was part of the original area set aside for Rimba Raya.

The Tjajadi brothers declined several requests by Reuters to comment.

The December allocation to PT Best came despite assurances from Forestry Minister Hasan that he would not allow deep peatlands to be converted for agriculture.

The allocation also came a day before a two-year moratorium on issuing licences to clear primary forests and peat lands was due to start on Jan. 1 this year. The moratorium is a key part of the climate deal with Norway.

After months of delay, the forestry ministry finally ruled that PT Rimba Raya was only eligible for 46,000 ha, a decision that cut out much of the peatlands covering nearly half the original project area.

OMBUDSMAN INVESTIGATES

The case has now been brought before the office of the Indonesian government’s ombudsman. In an interview, senior ombudsman Dominikus Fernandes told Reuters he believed the forestry ministry should issue the license to Rimba Raya.

“If Rimba Raya has already fulfilled the criteria, there should not be a delay in issuing the licence,” he said.

“This is a model project in Indonesia that should be prioritized. If we don’t give an example on the assurance of investing in Indonesia, that’s not a good thing.”

Officials from the forestry ministry, in a lengthy interview with Reuters, said the area was given legally for palm oil development because PT Best had claims to the land dating back to 2005.

Secretary-general of the ministry Hadi Daryanto stressed the peatland areas originally granted to Rimba Raya were on a type of forest called convertible production forest, which can be used for agriculture but not REDD projects. Handing that nearly 40,000 ha to Rimba Raya would be against the law, he said.

Yet in 2009, the ministry was ordered to make the title switch for this same area of peatland so it could be used for a REDD project. The instruction to immediately make the switch, a bureaucratic formality, was never acted on.

In the Oct. 2009 decree seen by Reuters, former forestry minister H.M.S. Kaban issued the order as part of a broader instruction setting aside the nearly 90,000 ha for ecosystem restoration projects. Kaban left office soon after.

Indonesian law also bans any clearing of peat lands more than three metres deep. An assessment of the Rimba Raya area by a peat expert hired by InfiniteEARTH showed the peat is three to seven metres deep, so in theory was out of bounds for PT Best to clear for agriculture.

For Lemons, 47, the mood has switched from exhilaration to bitter disappointment. “We’ve been here every day pushing like hell from every angle,” he said.

Procanik says the disappointment is personal. “Todd and I have both invested what savings we had for our kids’ college education in this project,” he said.

Gazprom is also upset.

In a letter dated June 16 to the Indonesian government, the Russian firm criticized the ministry’s failure to issue the licence for Rimba Raya and threatened to abandon clean-energy projects in Indonesia estimated to be worth more than $100 million in foreign investment. The government has yet to respond.

CARBON DREAMS?

Secretary-General Daryanto and Iman Santoso, director-general for forestry business management, said another major problem was InfiniteEARTH’s deal with Gazprom, which was made in the absence of any licence.

“We didn’t know about the contract with Gazprom. They had no legal right to make the contract,” Daryanto told Reuters.

Santoso described it as the project’s “fatal mistake.”

Daryanto also questioned whether REDD would ever work and whether there was any global appetite for carbon credits the program generates, a view at odds with other parts of the Indonesian government, which has been actively supporting REDD projects.

“Who will pay for the dream of Rimba Raya? Who will pay? Nobody, sir!” Daryanto told Reuters during an interview in the heavily forested ministry compound near central Jakarta.

Lemons said the Gazprom deal was explained in person during a presentation of a 300-page technical proposal submitted to the ministry to prove the project would be financially viable. Daryanto was among a ministry panel that approved the proposal.

“One of their biggest concerns was whether REDD could deliver the same revenues to the state as other land-use permits, such as palm oil, logging, mining. We were required to show contracts that demonstrated we could pay the fees and annual royalties,” he said.

Gazprom, designated as the sole marketer of carbon credits from Rimba Raya, said it had already agreed to long-term sales contracts with buyers at between 7 and 8 euros ($10 to $11.40) per tonne – contingent on the licence being issued.

“We’ve sold to four or five companies around that price,” said Dan Barry, Gazprom Marketing & Trading’s London-based global director of clean energy.

Gazprom became involved, he said, because it was a project that looked to have official support. The Russian company agreed to a financing mechanism that ensured the project’s viability for 30 years, regardless of the price level of carbon markets.

Those markets, centred on the European and UN carbon trading programs, were valued at $142 billion in 2010, the World Bank says. National carbon trading schemes are planned for Australia and South Korea, while California is planning a state-based scheme from 2013. New Zealand’s carbon market started in 2008.

“If you ever want a successful REDD scheme, you are going to have a process that people believe in,” Barry said.

“The Ministry of Forestry ought to be doing everything it can to support a program that benefits forestry as opposed to favour a program that’s there to cut it down and turn it into palm oil.”

“AHEAD OF ITS TIME”

Kuntoro Mangkusubroto, the head of the REDD task force in Indonesia who is also in charge of the president’s government reforms unit, said the Rimba Raya case highlighted deep flaws in the bureaucracy and the need for sweeping reforms to underpin the 40 other REDD projects in Indonesia.

“The core concern is the trust in government statements of readiness, and responsibility,” he told Reuters in an email. “Even with the best of intentions, the unsynchronous action of the central government’s ministry and the district government’s action is not conducive for investment, especially in this new kind of venture.

“I can surmise that the case of Rimba Raya is a case of a business idea that is ahead of its time. The government infrastructure is insufficiently ready for it.”

Legal action was one solution to this case, he added.

That is a path Lemons and Procanik may eventually take but for now they have proposed a land swap deal with PT Best in which the firm gives PT Rimba Raya 9,000 ha of peat land in return for a similar sized piece of non-peat land held by PT Rimba Raya in the north of the project near other PT Best landholdings.

PT Best rejected an earlier offer by Rimba Raya of nine per cent of the credits from the project, Lemons said.

Based on recent satellite images, PT Best has yet to develop the disputed 9,000 ha area.

The delays mean it is too late for Rimba Raya to become the world’s first project to issue REDD credits. That accolade has since gone to a Kenyan project.

“Our whole point here is to show host countries that REDD can pay its way,” Lemons said. “And if it can’t pay its way, then we haven’t proved anything.”

In a sign a resolution could still be possible, ombudsman Fernandes, Forestry Minister Hasan and PT Rimba Raya are scheduled to meet on Aug 19.

Link: http://www.montrealgazette.com/technology/Indonesia+crippled+climate+change/5283633/story.html

30 Juta Dollar untuk Kelola Hutan Sumber : Tribun Jambi – 17 Agustus 2011 Kabupaten Merangin dan Sarolangun, akan menjadi kabupaten percontohan di area Sumatera, untuk program pengelolaan hutan. Program tersebut bernama Indonesia-Australia Forest Carbon Partnership (IAFCP). Program ini intinya adalah pengelolaan hutan, untuk mengatasi masalah perubahan iklim global (global warming). Selain itu, ke depannya juga untuk program REDD (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation) “Untuk kesepakatan kerjasama telah ditandatangani oleh presiden RI dan Perdana Menteri Australia. Jadi, untuk wilayah Sumatera, Kabupaten Merangin dan Sarolangun yang mendapatkan program yang dicetuskan pihak Austalia ini,” ujar Kepala Badan Perencanaan Pembangunan Daerah (Bappeda) Merangin, Fajarman kepada Tribun, Kamis (18/8) via telepon. Fajar yang saat dihubungi akan bertolak ke Jakarta terkait program ini, menjelaskan, tahapan kerjasama tersebut saat ini adalah penandatanganan kesepakatan (MoU). MoU tersebut mengenai teknis-teknis di lapangan, bisa juga menyangkut pembagian hasil dari program yang dicanangkan. “Sudah ada beberapa tahapan yang dilalui. Kali ini adalah pertemuan kelima. Untuk penandatanganan MoU, nantinya akan diwakili Bappenas. Kita daerah hanya menjalankan hasil MoU tersebut,” ungkap Fajarman. Dari kerjasama tersebut, lanjutnya, dua kabupaten ini akan mendapatkan kucuran dana dari Pemerintah Australia. “Dana untuk dua kabupaten ini masing-masing sebesar 30 juta dolar Australia,” katanya. Dijelaskannya, dana yang diberikan akan digunakan untuk menjalankan program yang mencakup tiga bidang utama. Pertama, pengembangan kebijakan dan peningkatan kapasitas. Kedua, dukungan teknis pemantauan dan perhitungan karbon, dan ketiga, pengembangan kegiatan demonstrasi. Fajarman menyatakan, dipilihnya Merangin dan Sarolangun menjadi proyek percontohan, tentu ada indikator yang mendasarinya. “Adapun satu dari sekian indikatornya yang paling menonjol, yaitu, hutan-hutan yang ada di Kabupaten Merangin masih banyak dikelola masyarakat. Seperti, hutan adat, hutan desa, dan hutan tanaman rakyat (HTR),” tuturnya. Tambahnya, melalui pengelolaan seperti ini, secara otomatis, kelestarian hutan akan tetap terjaga, karena masyarakatnya sendiri yang mengolah. “Coba kalau hutan itu milik negara, tentu masyarakat tidak bisa ikut menikmatinya. Sementara, kalau hutan adat dan sejenisnya, masyarakat sendiri yang mengaturnya. Oleh karena itu, melalui program IAFC ini nanti, masyarak

30 Juta Dollar untuk Kelola Hutan
Sumber : Tribun Jambi – 17 Agustus 2011

Kabupaten Merangin dan Sarolangun, akan menjadi kabupaten percontohan di area Sumatera, untuk program pengelolaan hutan. Program tersebut bernama Indonesia-Australia Forest Carbon Partnership (IAFCP).

Program ini intinya adalah pengelolaan hutan, untuk mengatasi masalah perubahan iklim global (global warming). Selain itu, ke depannya juga untuk program REDD (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation)

“Untuk kesepakatan kerjasama telah ditandatangani oleh presiden RI dan Perdana Menteri Australia. Jadi, untuk wilayah Sumatera, Kabupaten Merangin dan Sarolangun yang mendapatkan program yang dicetuskan pihak Austalia ini,” ujar Kepala Badan Perencanaan Pembangunan Daerah (Bappeda) Merangin, Fajarman kepada Tribun, Kamis (18/8) via telepon.

Fajar yang saat dihubungi akan bertolak ke Jakarta terkait program ini, menjelaskan, tahapan kerjasama tersebut saat ini adalah penandatanganan kesepakatan (MoU). MoU tersebut mengenai teknis-teknis di lapangan, bisa juga menyangkut pembagian hasil dari program yang dicanangkan.

“Sudah ada beberapa tahapan yang dilalui. Kali ini adalah pertemuan kelima. Untuk penandatanganan MoU, nantinya akan diwakili Bappenas. Kita daerah hanya menjalankan hasil MoU tersebut,” ungkap Fajarman.

Dari kerjasama tersebut, lanjutnya, dua kabupaten ini akan mendapatkan kucuran dana dari Pemerintah Australia. “Dana untuk dua kabupaten ini masing-masing sebesar 30 juta dolar Australia,” katanya.

Dijelaskannya, dana yang diberikan akan digunakan untuk menjalankan program yang mencakup tiga bidang utama. Pertama, pengembangan kebijakan dan peningkatan kapasitas. Kedua, dukungan teknis pemantauan dan perhitungan karbon, dan ketiga, pengembangan kegiatan demonstrasi.

Fajarman menyatakan, dipilihnya Merangin dan Sarolangun menjadi proyek percontohan, tentu ada indikator yang mendasarinya. “Adapun satu dari sekian indikatornya yang paling menonjol, yaitu, hutan-hutan yang ada di Kabupaten Merangin masih banyak dikelola masyarakat. Seperti, hutan adat, hutan desa, dan hutan tanaman rakyat (HTR),” tuturnya.

Tambahnya, melalui pengelolaan seperti ini, secara otomatis, kelestarian hutan akan tetap terjaga, karena masyarakatnya sendiri yang mengolah. “Coba kalau hutan itu milik negara, tentu masyarakat tidak bisa ikut menikmatinya. Sementara, kalau hutan adat dan sejenisnya, masyarakat sendiri yang mengaturnya. Oleh karena itu, melalui program IAFC ini nanti, masyarakat akan dilibatkan. Bentuk bagi hasilnya seperti apa, ini yang akan dibicarakan lebih lanjut,” ujar Fajar.

Penulis : jariyanto
Editor : ridwan

Link :